Quit Facebook


(Dennis Lanigan) #1

FYI: I deleted my Facebook account. If people are trying to get a hold of me you can reach me here or just ask me for my e-mail or phone number.


Welcome to Bone Awl [The first feralculture network site]
Forget Facebook, Abandon Instagram, Move To A Village
(Kevin Tucker) #2

Dear IPC folks, please follow suit. Deleting that site feels fucking awesome. But it’s hard to keep discussions going until everyone else makes some moves.

This is my social media suicide note, of sorts: http://www.blackandgreenreview.org/2015/02/bagr-1-suffocating-void-kevin-tucker.html


(Joshua Finch) #3

I deactivated. Anyone here delete their account? I felt like I couldn’t dump everything that was saved there.

Basically if you deactivate you can still re-activate. I’ve found myself easily changing habits this way. While one is deactivated, notifications stop, so it breaks the ‘notification-hamster-wheel-cycle.’ Then one goes back with more clear motives, and can shut the door behind them again. Only drawback is it seems that either facebook lowers your ‘advertisement power’ or people forget you exist or something, and then you may not get as much attention as you once had when you were ‘in the cycle.’ Such has been my method / experience.


(Andrew) #4

In the latest “Facebook is almost totally useless” news… Facebook has disallowed the previous functionality to invite all users to an event, and the ability to email all group members. There is now no way to communicate important messages to all group members. The only way members get notified of events is through their news feed. And guess what? Facebook decides what shows up in everyone’s newsfeed! So yeah, in addition to the many social critiques of social networks, and Facebook in particular, there’s now the added deterrent of nobody seeing posts anyway. Oh, unless you pay for it of course.


(Dennis Lanigan) #5

I learned I had only deactivated my account. I reactivated as I saw there was no migration to the bbforum…and now that this forum is up and I like it I deactivated again. I’m actually not sure on how to delete my account fully. Oh well.


(Andrew) #6

(Dennis Lanigan) #7

OK. Now I deleted it.


(Kevin Tucker) #8

So the unfortunate thing here is that a lot of people aren’t following suit. I have a FB account solely to post on my pages. I loathe it all, but am finding that without FB I can’t get any traction with ambitious projects. BUT, the flipside is that FB is so insanely monetized now (incredibly worse than ever), so even though nearly 2,000 people “like” the Black and Green Press page, posts I make on there are getting roughly 30-70 views. If you don’t use it constantly and if you’re unwilling to pay anything, then it’s even more worthless and makes the begrudging task of logging on even more cumbersome.
So while neither this forum nor the B&G forum has gotten much traction, investing in them kind of limits our potential reach to grab folks even if they have been strong contributors in these same discussions.
I don’t propose going back on FB. I want to bash my face in even seeing the logo. But I’m not sure what to do to get that discussion back and move it forward.


(Joshua Finch) #9

"If you don’t use it constantly and if you’re unwilling to pay anything, then it’s even more worthless…"
Looks like the same phenomenon I’ve encountered. Facebook must be assigning an ‘advertising-power’ (viewer-scope) per post according to account activity, likes and comments. I know they do this for individuals’ posts to the feed, according to likes and comments, but I’m not sure if they do it according to activity, and what difference they make between pages and private accounts. They would have motivation because this dissuades/dis-incentivizes non-participation.

Teaching a free online course here might draw many users and more activity, and get everyone familiar with the setup. Such a prospect got me using reddit which I wouldn’t otherwise have bothered with.

But it seems many are content to act as news-outlets on the FB and group feeds. A common feed might be a good idea here.


(Andrew) #10

At what point does it become a question of whether people who, given alternatives, won’t communicate outside of Facebook are the wrong people to bring on the bus or boat or whatever analogy? I mean, there are strategic reasons for using various technologies, but it seems Facebook has become an end rather than means (not a fan of that framework either) for many.


(Kevin Tucker) #11

At what point does it become a question of whether people who, given alternatives, won’t communicate outside of Facebook are the wrong people to bring on the bus or boat or whatever analogy? I mean, there are strategic reasons for using various technologies, but it seems Facebook has become an end rather than means (not a fan of that framework either) for many.

Truth hurts.


(Andrew) #12

imported the entire facebook group since its inception into a new forum here so we have a non-totalitarian copy. it’s set to private to respect the “closed group” status. all that really means is it’s only available to logged in users of the forum–same as the facebook group. the bad news is that it doesn’t import linked content (images, url previews, etc.). oh well, a whole lot of text is better than nothin. oh, it doesn’t look like it imported comments from anyone who pre-deleted their accounts.


(Sean Gallagher) #13

I just deactivated my account, but will be back to sign up again to do what kt does, I will use it to stay in touch with the “Friends” I gained on there but will not update w/posts. Very excited to see what happens…


(Andrew) #14

I haven’t been “off facebook” lately so much as off everything but email. I have noticed the feeling that I no longer exist to other people because Facebook doesn’t work from here. “The medium is the message.” If you aren’t on Facebook, your face is not real.


(Andrew) #15

Deactivated.


(BenSpiritbear) #16

I’m cutting it way back until I can make sure I have a good way to stay connected with some good friends on there and then my account is gone. I was off for two years and enjoyed it a lot but I missed some good friends.


#17

I quit facebook and realized who my true friends are. About twenty of the people that I used to talk to either on facebook, or when something of theirs broke and they needed me to fix it, have dropped completely out of my life. Dropping the cell phone had a similar effect. Now, I can focus on the good in the world, work uninterrupted, and the only humans I have to deal with are the ones that care enough to drag their asses out from in front of the screen and come find me. It seems like a much more sustainable lifestyle to me.


(Andrew) #18

The footprints around the cabin since the last snow a week or two ago consist of mine and a squirrel. I am trying to ignore this signal.


(Sam Sycamore) #19

Man, it was awesome when I left Facebook in 2014 and didn’t come back until late 2016. Now I couldn’t imagine operating my podcast without it – I have no idea how I would’ve gained any traction or found an audience otherwise. It’s like trying to date but not being into “the bar scene.”


(BenSpiritbear) #20

The two years I was off I lost all contact with everyone. There were some positives in that but I did miss having a tribe and still miss that. Keep hoping internet connections will lead to that.